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Maggie Steber Photography collection

Overview

Scope and Contents

Biographical Note

Administrative Information

Detailed Description

Box 1

Mother's Funeral, November, 1987

Moments Later

Dead Blue Man, November

Ballot by Candlelight, December

Sulking on a Sunday Morning, May

When Hunger Overcomes Fear, January

Jean-Rabel Jesus, May

Peasant Family, May

Blue Lace Dress, December

Philomene, May

Rigged Elections, November



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Maggie Steber Photography collection, 1986-2010 | University of Miami Special Collections

By Maggie Steber and Cory Czajkowski

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Collection Overview

Title: Maggie Steber Photography collection, 1986-2010Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

ID: ASM0218

Creator: Maggie Steber (1949)

Extent: 44.0 Photographs

Languages: English

Scope and Contents of the Materials

The Maggie Steber Photography Collection contains thirty-three signed and dated 11x14 inch color prints on art paper and eleven large framed (33 1/4" x 43 3/4") prints. The collection documents photojournalist Maggie Steber's work in Haiti from 1986 to 2010.

Biographical Note

Maggie Steber is a documentary photographer who has worked in 63 countries around the world. Born and raised in Texas, she worked as a reporter and photographer at the Galveston Daily News in her early career before working as a picture editor for the Associated Press in New York. She was a contract photographer for Newsweek magazine for four years, and her work has been published in Life, National Geographic, the New Yorker, People, Time, Sports Illustrated, and Smithsonian, among others. Steber served as the Assistant Managing Editor of Photography and Features at the Miami Herald from 1999-2002, and 2007, she received a grant from the Knight Foundation to design a new newspaper prototype through the new Knight Center for International Media at the University of Miami. Her work in Haiti won the Alicia Patterson Foundation Grant and the Ernest Haas Grant, culminating in her 1991 publication, Dancing on Fire: Photographs From Haiti. Steber’s work is exhibited widely in museums around the world, and she has won numerous awards, including the World Press Foundation Award, the Leica Medal of Excellence, and an Overseas Press Club honor. She has also judged numerous photo competitions, including the World Press Photo Foundation, and the National Press Photographers Association Pictures of the Year.

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions: The collection is open for research.

Use Restrictions: Copyright is owned by Maggie Steber. Requests to publish or display materials from this collection require written permission from the rights owner. Please, contact asc.library@miami.edu for more information.

Acquisition Method: Collaborative Archives from the African Diaspora (CAAD) documents acquired thanks to a grant from the Florida Blue Cross Blue Shield, Summer 2013.

Related Materials:

Haitian Diaspora Oral Histories

The Audacity of Beauty – Maggie Steber and Her 25-Year Relationship with Haiti

Related Publications: Dancing on Fire: Photographs From Haiti / Photographs and Text By Maggie Steber, Introduction By Amy Wilentz

Preferred Citation: Maggie Steber Photography Collection, Special Collections Division, University of Miami Libraries, Coral Gables, Florida.

Processing Information: Collection-level description by Beatrice Skokan, Manuscripts Librarian, 2016.


Box and Folder Listing


Browse by Box:

[Box 1: 1986-2010],
[Item 1: Mother's Funeral, November, 1987],
[Item 2: Moments Later, 1990],
[Item 3: Dead Blue Man, November, 1987],
[Item 4: Ballot by Candlelight, December, 1990],
[Item 5: Sulking on a Sunday Morning, May, 2010],
[Item 6: When Hunger Overcomes Fear, January, 1986],
[Item 7: Jean-Rabel Jesus, May, 1968],
[Item 8: Peasant Family, May, 1968],
[Item 9: Blue Lace Dress, December, 1990],
[Item 10: Philomene, May, 1988],
[Item 11: Rigged Elections, November, 1987],
[All]

Box 1: 1986-2010Add to your cart.
Box 1 contains thirty-three signed and dated 11x14 inch color prints on art paper.
Item 1: Rubble Street, January 2010Add to your cart.
Rubble of collapsed buildings fill a downtown street in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, two weeks after a massive earthquake hit the impoverished island killing over 350,000 people and leaving over one million homeless. Most of the downtown was destroyed as well as neighborhoods throughout the hilly capital city.
Item 2: His Cross to Bear, January 27, 2010Add to your cart.
A wounded Haitian man struggles in pain to carry a heavy beam through rubble-strewn downtown Port-au-Prince two weeks following the massive earthquake that struck Haiti in January 2010. Haitians who lost everything collected whatever could be salvaged from collapsed buildings to help rebuild their homes.  Over 350,000 people were killed and one million were left homeless to live in makeshift tents made from bedspreads, sheets, and plastic, or whatever they could find.
Item 3: Pleading for Aid, February 2010Add to your cart.
A Haitian woman pleads with American military to help her with her sick mother in the bidonville of Rabato outside Gonaives, Haiti, weeks after a massive earthquake struck the impoverished country.
Item 4: Marines Arrive, October 1994Add to your cart.
A Haitian boy covers his head with his shirt as dirt and dust are kicked up by U.S. Marine helicopters landing in Gonaives, Haiti in October 1994, shortly before the return of the exiled President Jean Bertrand Aristide to resume power.  Aristide was overthrown in a military coup d’etat three years earlier. After slapping an economic embargo on the country and watching the situation worsen dramatically, U.S. President Bill Clinton decided to return Aristide to power. Marines came into Haiti several weeks prior to the return to “clean things up.”
Item 5: Philomene, May 1988Add to your cart.
Philomene, a young Haitian schoolgirl, poses for a portrait against the school wall in her village of Beauchamps, in the dry northwest of Haiti in May 1988.  Philomene embodies the singular beauty and pride of her people.
Item 6: Mother's Funeral, 1987Add to your cart.
A young Haitian man struggles in grief at the funeral of his mother in the National Cemetery in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, in November 1987. His family and friends try to hold him back from the coffin about to be placed into a crypt.  The woman was one of hundreds of Haitians who died during pre-election violence leading up to the November 1987 presidential elections, the first in thirty years, following the fall of the Duvalier family dictatorship.
Item 7: Pre-inaugural Horror, January 1991Add to your cart.
Haitian President-elect Jean-Bertrand Aristide leans in a doorway of his orphanage in the center of Port-au-Prince after the building was firebombed, killing four of the boys who were sleeping inside, just a week or two before he was inaugurated.
Item 8: Sweet Victory, 1990Add to your cart.
Supporters of presidential candidate Jean Bertrand Aristide, a former priest, celebrate his victory at the polls in December 1990 in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Over 85% of the voting public elected the firebrand priest, despite the attacks by renegade bands of men determined to stop the polling.
Item 9: Ballot By Candlelight, 1990Add to your cart.
A Haitian voter in the Carrefour Feuille neighborhood of Port-au-Prince pores over the presidential and congressional candidates in the 1990 elections that brought Jean-Bertrand Aristide, a former priest, to power as president. Aristide was elected by 80% of the voting population. All over the country, citizens lined up into the night, voting by candlelight and braving threats from drive-by thugs who shot into the crowds.
Item 10: Crucified Justice, 1990Add to your cart.
A Haitian policeman waits for an accused thief to reach shore at the harbor in Port-au-Prince, Haiti in 1990, after the man was caught in middle of a robbery.  Once the man's foot touched shore, a second policeman at the side raised his rifle and shot the man, killing him on the spot.  Justice and the lack of it has plagued Haiti for decades, and often takes place on the spot without charges or fair trials.
Item 11: Call to Azaca, 1989Add to your cart.
A drummer beats out a rhythm as hounsis—vodou participant members of the peristyle (vodou temple)—dance in an effort to call the spirit of Azaca, the vodou spirit of agriculture, to a ceremony in a vodou temple (peristyle) in the Bel Aire area of Pt-au-Prince, Haiti, in 1989.
Item 12: Rigged Elections, 1988Add to your cart.
A Haitian boy watches fireman race across street to help douse fires after Haitians set downtown Port-au-Prince, the capital, on fire in protest of perceived rigged presidential elections in January 1988.  Elections in November 1987 were cancelled due to terrible widespread violence. The army put forward Lesly Manigat, who won the elections despite a very low voter turnout. He was ousted in a coup d’etat four months later.
Item 13: Still Haiti Under the Gun, February 7, 1988Add to your cart.
A Haitian bows to newly-inaugurated President Lesly Manigat during an inaugural reception at the National Palace on February 7, 1988 in Pt-au-Prince.  Voter turnout was low but Manigat was installed by the military anyway. Standing at guard, a Haitian commander holds an uzi as a show of force.  Four months later, Manigat was overthrown in a military coup d’etat, showing that Haiti was still under the gun of the military.
Item 14: Monsieur Milot, 1990Add to your cart.
The Madman of La Saline is what Monsieur Milot is called by the market vendors who surround his corner in La Saline, one of the worst slums in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.  The market women often give him scraps of food as he is unable to work.
Item 15: Dead Blue Man, November 1987Add to your cart.
The body of a man sits in the alcove of a home along a well-traveled path in Carrefour, a poor neighborhood on the southern edge of Port-au-Prince, in November 1987, a few days before Haiti’s  first democratic presidential elections in 30 years.  All-night shooting sessions went on for several weeks prior to the elections.  The unidentified killers displayed the corpse to warn people of their fate, if they voted in the elections.  When election day arrived, the polls opened and closed in one hour after many people were massacred at polling stations.  Elections were cancelled.
Item 16: Coffin Protest, July 1987Add to your cart.
Haitians march through the streets of downtown Port-au-Prince the day after soldiers shot into a crowd of peaceful unarmed demonstrators, killing dozens.  In protest, the people built small coffins and painted the names of all those killed, marched through the streets after a mass in front of the National Cathedral, and carried them to the cemetery in mock burials.
Item 17: Street Boys, November 1987Add to your cart.
Street kids hang out in the shade on their corner in downtown Port-au-Prince, Haiti in November 1987.
Item 18: Market Mirrors, May 1988Add to your cart.
Reflected in bright plastic mirrors from China, Haitians walk past other imported products in a country market in Jean-Rabel, Haiti, in May 1988. Haiti is a market for many imports from larger nations. They import many products but export very little.
Item 19: Macoute Trial, July 1986Add to your cart.
Lawyers for famed Ton-Ton Macoute boss Paul Vericain glance in fear at the reaction of an overflowing courtroom mob, after declaring his client’s  innocence of charges for hundreds of murders  under the Duvalier  regime. Soon after the fall of the dictator in February 1986, several leading Macoutes were tried and imprisoned in July 1986.
Item 20: When Hunger Overcomes Fear, January 1986Add to your cart.
In January 1986, riots and demonstrations against the Duvalier regime broke out throughout Haiti, especially in Cap-Haitien in the north.  Following a full day of peaceful demonstrations over the high price of food, starving Haitians ransacked a huge food depot for CARE, a U.S. aid agency. People covered the building like ants on a piece of candy, despite the efforts of the Haitian army and police to drive them back as with a boy who tried to pull a box of food from beneath a shuttered door. One week later, the thirty-year Duvalier family dictatorship fell and Jean-Claude Duvalier fled with his family and loyal officers into exile with the help of the United States.
Item 21: Burning Barricades, November 1987Add to your cart.
Haitians watch as a big passenger bus roars through burning barricades on a Port-au-Prince street during widespread pre-election violence in the weeks leading up to the first democratic elections in thirty years in Haiti, November 1987.
Item 22: Televised Military Takeover, May 1988Add to your cart.
Haitian Army General Henri Namphy appears on Haitian national television after taking over the elected government in late May 1988, overthrowing elected president Lesly Manigat.
Item 23: Avril Takes the Helm, 1988Add to your cart.
A boy and his father at the salt flats outside Gonaives, Haiti, 1988.
Item 24: Mourning Her Father, November 1987Add to your cart.
A Haitian girl weeps in despair as she follows her father’s coffin during the funeral march to the National Cemetery in downtown Port-au-Prince, where he will be buried. The man was killed during election day violence in November 1987 when voters were slaughtered at polling stations and in the streets as they tried to go vote in the first democratic elections in thirty years.
Item 25: Mon Reve, 1987Add to your cart.
Mon Revel lottery bank, Grande Rue, Port-au-Prince, Haiti 1987.
Item 26: Street Boys, 1987Add to your cart.
Three street boys wake up to the morning light in an abandoned vodou temple where they sleep at night in a slum called Tokyo in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, 1987.
Item 27: Salt Flats, May 1988Add to your cart.
A boy and his father at the salt flats outside Gonaives, Haiti, 1988.
Item 28: Sulking on a Sunday Morning, May 2010Add to your cart.
A boy sulks outside the makeshift hut where he lives with his family and hundreds of other Haitians in a tent city in the Champs de Mars, the main plaza across from the toppled National Palace several months after a massive earthquake struck Haiti, killing over 350,000 and leaving more than one million homelss, in Port-au-Prince in April 2010.
Item 29: Bel Aire Temple, 1987Add to your cart.
A vodou priest prays before a mural of Erzuli Freda, one of the goddesses of love, in a peristyle or vodou temple in Bel Aire section of Port-au-Prince, Haiti in 1987.  He wears a dwapo vodou—Creole for vodou flag or spirit banner showing St. Jacques or Ogou Ferail, the powerful war spirit.  Erzuli is often depicted as the Holy Virgin.
Item 30: Vodou in the Cemetery, 1988Add to your cart.
A vodou priest holds a vodou ceremony to Baron Samedi, a member of the the vodou spirits of death family, in the National Cemetery in Port-au-Prince, Haiti in 1988.
Item 31: Fried Pork and Plantains, July 1987Add to your cart.
A Haitian boy laughs as a dog sniffs around the fried pork and plantains he is selling in La Saline, a market and slum in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, 1987.
Item 32: Peasant Family, 1988Add to your cart.
A Haitian peasant woman and her children pose for a formal portrait in front of their small home in Duverger, a small farming village in southern Haiti, 1988.
Item 33: Blue Lace Dress, December 1990Add to your cart.
A young girl dancing in her blue lace dress belies the sinister poverty and violence that resides in the dusty barren streets of Rabato, a slum just outside Gonaives, Haiti.  Rabato is a scene of regular political protest and is thus the target of numerous slaughters and attacks on its citizens. But on this day, there was only the singing and dancing of this young Haitian.
Item 1: Mother's Funeral, November, 1987Add to your cart.

A young Haitian man struggles in grief at the funeral of his mother in the National Cemetery in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, in November 1987. His family and friends try to hold him back from the coffin about to be placed into a crypt.  The woman was one of hundreds of Haitians who died during pre-election violence leading up to the November 1987 presidential elections, the first in thirty years, following the fall of the Duvalier family dictatorship.

Framed print.

Item 2: Moments Later, 1990Add to your cart.

A Haitian policeman waits for an accused thief to reach shore at the harbor in Port-au-Prince, Haiti in 1990, after the man was caught in middle of a robbery.  Once the man's foot touched shore, a second policeman at the side raised his rifle and shot the man, killing him on the spot.  Justice and the lack of it has plagued Haiti for decades, and often takes place on the spot without charges or fair trials.

Framed print.

Item 3: Dead Blue Man, November, 1987Add to your cart.

The body of a man sits in the alcove of a home along a well-traveled path in Carrefour, a poor neighborhood on the southern edge of Port-au-Prince, in November 1987, a few  days before Haiti’s  first democratic presidential elections in 30 years.  All-night shooting sessions went on for several weeks prior to the elections.  The unidentified killers displayed the corpse to warn people of their fate, if they voted in the elections.  When election day arrived, the polls opened and closed in one hour after many people were massacred at polling stations.  Elections were cancelled.

Framed print.

Item 4: Ballot by Candlelight, December, 1990Add to your cart.

A Haitian voter in the Carrefour Feuille neighborhood of Port-au-Prince pores over a ballot showing the presidential and congressional candidates in the December 1990 elections.  All over the country citizens lined up into the night, voting by candlelight and braving threats from drive-by thugs who shot into the crowds. Jean-Bertrand Aristide, a former priest, won the elections to assume power as president. Aristide was elected by better than 80% of the voting population.  December 1990.

Framed print.

Item 5: Sulking on a Sunday Morning, May, 2010Add to your cart.

A Haitian boy sulks outside the makeshift plywood hut he shares with his family in a tent camp in the center of Port-au-Prince after his mother admonished him for not doing his chores in May 2010.  He and as many as one million Haitians were left homeless following a massive earthquake that struck Haiti in January 2010, killing over 350,000 people.

Framed print.

Item 6: When Hunger Overcomes Fear, January, 1986Add to your cart.

In January 1986, riots and demonstrations against the Duvalier regime broke out throughout Haiti, especially in Cap-Haitien in the north.  Following a full day of peaceful demonstrations over the high price of food, starving Haitians ransacked a huge food depot for CARE, a U.S. aid agency. People covered the building like ants on a piece of candy, despite the efforts of the Haitian army and police to drive them back as with a boy who tried to pull a box of food from beneath a shuttered door. One week later, the thirty-year Duvalier family dictatorship fell and Jean-Claude Duvalier fled with his family and loyal officers into exile with the help of the United States.

Framed print.

Item 7: Jean-Rabel Jesus, May, 1968Add to your cart.

A small Haitian boy sits in front of a painting of Jesus on the porch of his house in Jean-Rabel. May 1988.

Framed print.

Item 8: Peasant Family, May, 1968Add to your cart.

A Haitian peasant farm wife and her children pose proudly for a family portrait they requested in the small village of Duverger, near Fond des Negres in southern Haiti. May 1988.

Framed print.

Item 9: Blue Lace Dress, December, 1990Add to your cart.
A young girl dancing in her blue lace dress belies the sinister poverty and violence that resides in the dusty barren streets of Rabato, a slum just outside Gonaives, Haiti.  Rabato is a scene of regular political protest and is thus the target of numerous slaughters and attacks on its citizens. But on this day, there was only the singing and dancing of this young Haitian.  December 1990.
Item 10: Philomene, May, 1988Add to your cart.
Philomene, a young Haitian schoolgirl, poses for a portrait against the school wall in her village of Beauchamps, in the dry northwest of Haiti in May 1988.  Philomene embodies the singular beauty and pride of her people.
Item 11: Rigged Elections, November, 1987Add to your cart.

A Haitian boy watches fireman race across street to help douse fires after Haitians set downtown Port-au-Prince, the capital, on fire in protest of perceived rigged presidential elections in January 1988.  Elections in November 1987 were cancelled due to terrible widespread violence. The army put forward Lesly Manigat, who won the elections despite a very low voter turnout. He was ousted in a coup d’etat four months later.

Framed print.


Browse by Box:

[Box 1: 1986-2010],
[Item 1: Mother's Funeral, November, 1987],
[Item 2: Moments Later, 1990],
[Item 3: Dead Blue Man, November, 1987],
[Item 4: Ballot by Candlelight, December, 1990],
[Item 5: Sulking on a Sunday Morning, May, 2010],
[Item 6: When Hunger Overcomes Fear, January, 1986],
[Item 7: Jean-Rabel Jesus, May, 1968],
[Item 8: Peasant Family, May, 1968],
[Item 9: Blue Lace Dress, December, 1990],
[Item 10: Philomene, May, 1988],
[Item 11: Rigged Elections, November, 1987],
[All]



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