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Haitian Diaspora Oral History collection

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Haitian Diaspora Oral History collection, 2010-2013 | University of Miami Special Collections

By Kevin Mason and Lucrece Louisdhon-Louinis

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Collection Overview

Title: Haitian Diaspora Oral History collection, 2010-2013Add to your cart.View associated digital content.

ID: ASM0085

Extent: 0.5 Linear Feet

Languages: English, French, Haitian;HaitianCreole

Scope and Contents of the Materials

The Haitian Diaspora Oral History collection includes videos and selected transcripts of oral history interviews conducted with individuals of Haitian ancestry that are well-renowned in the world of the arts, community activism, civic leadership, and many professional organizations. The interviews were conducted by Kevin Mason, Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis and Béatrice Colastin Skokan.

Subject/Index Terms

Haitians
Haitians - United States
Oral history

Administrative Information

Access Restrictions: The collection is open for research.

Use Restrictions: Copyright to these materials lies with the University of Miami. They may not be reproduced, retransmitted, published, distributed, or broadcast without the permission of Special Collection. For information about obtaining copies or to request permission to publish any part of an interview, please contact Special Collections at asc.library@miami.edu.

Acquisition Method: Made possible with a grant from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida.

Related Materials: Haitian Women of Miami (FANM) Records, 1991-2011

Preferred Citation: Haitian Diaspora Oral History Collection, Special Collections, University of Miami Libraries, Coral Gables, Florida.

Processing Information: Archon input by Dvora Harel (Student Assistant), Yvette Yurubi and Antonio Sierra (Student Assistant)  under the supervision of Beatrice Skokan (Manuscripts Librarian), Spring-Fall 2013.

Other Note: These oral histories express the views, memories and opinions of their respective interviewees. They do not represent the viewpoints of the University of Miami, its officers, agents, employees, or volunteers. The University of Miami makes no warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of any information contained in the interviews and expressly disclaims any liability therefor.


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Box 1Add to your cart.
Folder 1: Monvelyno Alexis Interview, May 18, 2012Add to your cart.

Monvelyno Alexis is a Haitian musician in the sanba tradition. The movement derives from the style of Haitian mizik racine and began with the musician Lesly Louis Marcelin who performs as "Sanba Zao." Alexis performs throughout the world and has several residencies in Brooklyn, NY, where he lives. Alexis is also a painter who uses Veve imagery of Vodou. In this interview, Alexis covers his musical career, his work as a painter, and the deeply ingrained spirituality he has as a Haitian musician in the Diaspora.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Miami, FL

Folder 2: Marcel Alexis Interview, January 15, 2012Add to your cart.

Marcel Alexis is a singer, songwriter, and poet based in South Miami, Florida. He has recorded six albums since 1975 and is active in youth education programs in Miami. In this interview, he talks about the Haitian community in South Miami and his involvement as Founder and President of the Center for Artistic and Cultural Events in Our Community (CACEC). The organization helps develop young Haitian musical talent through educational programs and performance opportunities. He cites the success of several former students who honed their skills in CACEC's programs to continue their studies in arts performance. He studied music under well-known Haitian singer Ansy Derose and has led a musical career that includes recording, performing, and acting as Choir Director at Christ The King Catholic Church.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Length of interview (in minutes): 31:32

Miami-Dade College, Kendall, FL

Folder 3: Yvon “Kapi” André InterviewsAdd to your cart.
This interview is with Yvon "Kapi" André of Tabou Combo, arguably Haiti's most famous and internationally acclaimed band. The drummer talks about the band's origins in Pétionville's teenage music scene among other bands like Les Shleu Shleu and the Difficiles de Pétionville. André joined the band, originally known as Los Incognitos, and was an innovator in the konpa rhythm. Notably, the band has also been covered by Carlos Santana and introduced to a larger world stage. The band had a #1 hit in 1975 in the French recording industry for their song "New York CIty," a tale of the Haitian experience in the Diaspora that achieved them national fame and celebrity. Since then, they've performed on nearly every continent and have achieved the most financial success for a Haitian konpa band.
Item 1: Yvon “Kapi” André Interview, April 11, 2012Add to your cart.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Length of interview (in minutes): 48:13

Kendall, FL

Item 2: Yvon “Kapi” André Interview, May 20, 2012Add to your cart.
Interviewer: Kevin Mason
Folder 4: Jonas Jean "Maestro Joujou" of DJA-Rara Interview, March 6, 2011Add to your cart.

Interview with Jonas Jean "Maestro Joujou" of DJA-Rara music group located in Brooklyn, New York that aims to keep Haitian culture alive in the Diaspora. Maestro Joujou is the band leader for DJA-Rara. This audio-only interview was conducted and edited by Kevin Mason for broadcast on the University of Miami radio station, WVUM. In the interview, Maestro Joujou discusses Rara music, carnival, the vaksin musical instrument, and traveling with DJA-Rara. The interview features two songs, "Fig Nan Men" and "Zwazo Vole."

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Length of interview (in minutes): 34:22

Coral Gables, FL

Folder 5: Jean-Michel Daudier Interview, September 28, 2010Add to your cart.

This interview was conducted with Jean-Michel Daudier in Aventura, Florida, in Spetember 2010. Mr. Daudier is most well known for his anthem "Lem Pa We Soley La" (When I Can't See The Sun) and its historical place in the popular overthrow of Haitian dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier on February 7th, 1986. The song became an anthem for the movement and mobilized many demands for Duvalier's removal. Daudier partnered the song with the rising influence of the Catholic Church as the main voice of opposition by using popular themes of liberation theology that took hold in the country at that time. This interview focuses on the issues surrounding the writing of the song, his life following the democratic moment, and his career in the United States.

Mr. Daudier left Haiti in 1989 after he felt very little had changed in the country. Because he was a visible symbol of resistance to the Duvalier regime, he often felt threatened and was subjected to frequent stops during the military-mandated curfew. Such factors caused him to leave his home country and live abroad in the "Tenth Department." He now performs his important song and many others weekly at Casa Champet in Pembroke Pines, FL.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Aventura, FL

Folder 6: Edouard Duval-Carrié Interview, January 16, 2012Add to your cart.

Interview with Edouard Duval-Carrié, a Haitian-born painter and sculptor based in Miami. After leaving Port-au-Price due to political instability under the Duvalier regime, Duval-Carrié's family settled in Puerto Rico. He then studied urban planning in Canada before focusing on art. A world-renowned artist, Duval Carrié uses his position in the global art world to reframe Haitian art that has been misrepresented by stereotypes based on limited interactions between artists and art buyers. Through various cultural organizations and personal initiatives, Duval-Carrié uses his painting and sculpture to show a Haiti that is modern and cosmopolitan. In this interview, Duval-Carrié discusses his career and the path that took him from Haiti to Miami. He also talks about the influence of Vodou in his work, his efforts to reframe perceptions of Haitian art, and projects to support the art community and museums in Haiti.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Length of interview (in minutes): 38:08

Miami, FL

Folder 7: Sophia Lacroix Interview, July 25, 2012Add to your cart.

Interview with Sophia Lacroix, a Haitian-born painter who is based in South Florida. Through her work using the hyperrealism style, Lacroix aims to "transport" the observer to a vision of Haiti that conjures up images of her childhood through nostalgic portraits of everyday Haitians. She describes her style in terms of vibrant colors and uses powerful imagery to depict "the strength and bravery of the Haitian people and the innocence and playfulness of its children." The City of North Miami recognized her as Artist of the Year in May of 2007, which led to her increased presence in the art world in cities across the country. Her most public work is a 3' x 3' mural at the Little Haiti Cultural Complex in Miami, which was completed in February of 2009. This interview covers her current accomplishments and directions she has taken since becoming an artist as well as the outside expectations placed on her as a Haitian-American artist.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Length of interview (in minutes): 42:12

Coral Gables, FL

Folder 8: Viktor El-Saieh InterviewsAdd to your cart.
Viktor El-Saieh is a painter who works between Miami and Port-au-Prince. He is the grandson of celebrated Haitian bandleader Issa El-Saieh, who amassed the largest private collection of Haitian art. His family now runs the El-Saieh Gallery that has frequent visitors during weekends by appointment. The Haitian artist discusses his current works a year on from his opening of Historical Precedence and the present state of the El-Saieh Gallery in Port-au-Prince. He has recently been commissioned by a private collector and speaks about his new works being commissioned. The gallery housed many well-known Haitian artists who worked and painted on the grounds. Viktor El-Saieh is currently the only artist painting there.
Item 1: Viktor El-Saieh Interview, June 19, 2012Add to your cart.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Item 2: Viktor El-Saieh Interview, March 12, 2011Add to your cart.

This interivew is with the visual artist Viktor El-Saieh on the opening of his show "Historical Precedence" on March 12, 2011 in Miami, FL. The show depicts Haitian leadership through a series of portraits and gives El-Saieh's insights to Haitian projections of their own historical governance. His work takes on projections of historical figures like Toussaint L'ouverture to the most recent president Michel Martelly. This interview seeks to address questions dealing with the artist's output here in Miami as well as how his work has been influenced by his home country of Haiti.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Length of interview (in minutes): 23:00

Miami, FL

Folder 9: Adlore Casseus "Empress Addi" and Patrick Dorce of Rara Rock Interview, December 16, 2012Add to your cart.

Interview with Adlore Casseus "Empress Addi," and Patrick Dorcé of Rara Rock, a Haitian roots world beat band based in North Miami. Casseus, the singer for Rara Rock, is a doctoral student in education and performs as "Empress Addi." Dorcé is the guitar player for Rara Rock. The interview explores Haitian culture and music, with an emphasis on the rara style, as well as the Haitian community in Miami, especially North Miami. Casseus and Dorcé also talk about the history of their band, Rara Rock, and they perform three songs. Casseus also discusses her childhood and musical influences.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Length of interview (in minutes): 56:39

North Miami, FL

Folder 10: Jean-Philippe Guillaume Interview, May 19, 2012Add to your cart.

Interview with Jean-Philippe Guillaume, who is the creator and engineer of Mizikpam.com, a Haitian music aggregator similar to Pandora, Last.Fm, and Spotify. He moved to South Florida from Port-au-Prince. His grandfather was a saxophonist and his great uncle was the bandleader Raoul Guillaume. Guillaume talks about the progression of Haitian music, the widespread style of genres on the website, and his general knowledge about the "ancestry" and story elements of the country's popular music. He also traces the history of the organization, the listenership, and the presence of Haitian music in South Florida.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Length of interview (in minutes): 39:30

Miami, FL

Folder 11: Michèle Jessica Fièvre Interview, June 14, 2012Add to your cart.

Interview with Michèle Jessica Fièvre, a writer who grew up in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and relocated to South Florida in 2002. She wrote her first novel as a teenager, and has since published several novels and children's books in French. Her writing has also been published in a variety of anthologies and journals. She has an MFA in creative writing from Florida International University, and is involved in the Women Writers of Haitian Descent, Inc. This interview discusses the Haitian writing community in South Florida, as well as her upcoming writing projects and her work as a school teacher.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Length of interview (in minutes): 37:24

Coral Gables, FL

Folder 12: Smith Jean-Baptiste Interview, September 10, 2011Add to your cart.

Interview with Smith Jean-Baptiste, the influential percussionist in the band Les Shleu Sheu. Started in 1966, the band rose to fame playing after volleyball games in their local high schools. In this interview, Jean-Baptiste speaks about the seminal days of konpa until the band moved to New York in the 1970s. Today, South Florida is the capital of konpa music, with at least 10-15 well-know Haitian konpa bands in Miami-Dade and Broward counties, including Les Shleu Shleu. The band members all live in South Florida, which Jean-Baptiste considers the "Capital of Konpa Music." In this interview, Smith Jean-Baptiste covers the historical roots of the band, its transition in the diaspora, and their performance today. The inteview also includes a live demonstration of his kalisembal (riding the cymbal) technique.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Length of interview (in minutes): 25:05

Pembroke Pines, FL

Folder 13: Yves Joseph Interview, June 9, 2012Add to your cart.

Interview with Yves "Fanfan" Joseph, manager and vocalist for Tabou Combo, the most commercially successful Haitian band. Joseph has been with Tabou Combo since August 1968. In this interview, he explains the commercial origins of the band and how they faced adversity in collecting royalties in international markets. After selling half a million records of their 1976 single "New York City" and not receiving royalties, Joseph began studying the music business as a means of protecting the group from record label exploitation. Joseph describes Tabou Combo's creative and financial encounters with Carlos Santana, who covered their song "Mabouya." He also provides an overview of the band's international travels as the first Haitian band in Japan, throughout Africa, and the Lesser Antilles. Tabou Combo was one of the several mini-djaz groups influenced by French popular music, the Beatles, and the Rolling Stones, among other international styles built on top of their traditional konpa music. Joseph describes the longevity, repertoire, and fan reception of the group and how they utilize SACEM to retain royalties. The band has increased its international presence, reaching into new territory in Gabon and Angola.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Length of interview (in minutes): 28:03

Hollywood, FL

Folder 14: Erol Josué InterviewsAdd to your cart.
Born into vodou tradition in Port-au-Prince in 1970, Erol Josué took on the calling of houngon (vodou priest) at the remarkably young age of seventeen. Despite that this element of his life does not seem to dominate his reative work on a world market, this piece of his biography becomes a key component of how Josué is presented to international music markets. In this interview, Josué touches on his role as a healer, houngan, and a performer worldwide. These roles all impact his status as a musician, though it is often exagggerated when describing the artist's output. He considers himself a "worldbeat" artist who performs electro-vodou music, a difficult style to market on the international scene. While popular Caribbean music like zouk and soca are enjoyed worldwide, popular Haitian music is isolated to smaller markets in the Diasporic community. Artists who do not strictly fall into specific categories like konpa or razin pose a challenge to record labels in how to present the artists to their desired demographics. This creates a void of accurate description that often includes terms that do not convey the artist's overall aesthetic. This void creates new ways to present the artist based on marekt decisions, though the use of vodou in marketing is disproportionate to its discernable influence of his music.
Item 1: Erol Josué Interview, February 13, 2011Add to your cart.

This interview with Erol Josué took place on the phone about his work at Duke University, his international tours, and general aesethetics of his electro-Vodou music. The audio file includes his commentary on the music of album "Regleman" (Mi5 Recordings) and coveres talking points about being a Haitian artist in a global music market.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Length of interview (in minutes): 20:04

Miami, FL

Item 2: Erol Josué Interview, April 21, 2011Add to your cart.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Coral Gables, FL

Item 3: Erol Josué Interview, June 17, 2011Add to your cart.

This interview is one of a series with houngan and world-beat performer Erol Josué. This meeting took place at his home in the Design District area of Miami, the bustling artistic community and southern entrance into Little Haiti. This afternoon meeting took place on June 17th, 2011 and addressed several questions of Josué's role as a voudou priest and a spiritual healer and the importance of the song "Twa Fey" in the context to the Haitian Diaspora and healing. Erol Josué is a performer who has presented the music of Haiti worldwide, often seeking to educate his audiences about his culture and dispelling myths about voudou spirituality. One question he seeks to address is why Haitian performers actively take on educational roles in their music and if this impedes on creative innovation in such music in world markets.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Miami, FL

Item 4: Erol Josué Interview, July 13, 2011Add to your cart.

Interview with Erol Josué, a healer, houngan (Vodou priest), and performer who has been called the “Prince of Haitian roots music.” This interview took place before Josué returned to Haiti for the first time since 1996, in order to initiate his brother and sister to “take up the asson,” the term for taking on the vows of a houngan or mambo (priestess).  Josué explains the reasons for returning to Haiti for the ceremony, which carries importance throughout the Diaspora.  As a travelling musician, he observes how different cultures view Vodou culture.  In Guadeloupe, for instance, promoters choose to not to market him as a “Vodou priest,” but rather as a “big priest.”  In some Caribbean cultures, like Martinique, fans express curiosity about his religion and beliefs.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Miami, FL

Item 5: Régléman Music CD by Erol Josué, 2007Add to your cart.
A CD, containing 13 tracks performed and produced by Erol Josué and distributed by Mi5 Recordings.
Item 6: "The Prince of Haitians Roots Music" PortfolioAdd to your cart.
Folder contains several documents outlining Erol Josué's work and contributions to his style of music.
Folder 15: Louis Leslie Marcelin "Sanba Zao" InterviewsAdd to your cart.
Item 1: Louis Leslie Marcelin "Sanba Zao" Interview, May 6, 2012Add to your cart.

Interview with Louis Leslie Marcelin, better known as Sanba Zao in the Haitian music community. In addition to his work as a musician, Marcelin and his wife Mireille run the Bazilo École Communautaire, one of the first elementary schools in Haiti that re-opened followed the earthquake of January 12, 2012. In this interview, Marcelin talks about his career as an influential mizik racine (roots music) artist and his work with the groups Group Sa, Foula Jazz, Djakata, as well as the legacy of his son's group Sweet Djakata, a contemporary roots music group. He also traces the history of Haitian roots music, including the background and influences that shaped the sound following the end of the Jean-Claude Duvalier military dictatorship in 1986. The interview questions are in English and Marcelin speaks in Haitian Creole with Jean-Philippe Guillaume translating.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Length of interview (in minutes): 25:56

Coral Gables, FL

Item 2: Louis Leslie Marcelin "Sanba Zao" in Haiti, June 21, 2012Add to your cart.

Interview with Louis Leslie Marcelin, better known as Sanba Zao in the Haitian music community. In addition to his work as a musician, Marcelin and his wife Mireille run the Bazilo École Communautaire, one of the first elementary schools in Haiti that re-opened followed the earthquake of January 12, 2012. This interview is in Creole and takes place in Haiti.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Port-au-Prince, Haiti

Item 3: Performance of Louis Leslie Marcellin "Sanba Zao" at Tap Tap in Miami BeachAdd to your cart.
2 copies.
Item 4: Performance of Louis Leslie Marcellin "Sanba Zao" at MOCA Cafe in MiamiAdd to your cart.
2 copies.
Folder 16: Markus Schwartz and Monvelyno Alexis of Vo-Duo and Louis Leslie Marcelin "Sanba Zao" Interview, May 5, 2012Add to your cart.

Interview with Markus Schwartz and Monvelyno Alexis of Vo-Duo and Louis Leslie Marcelin "Sanba Zao," recorded during the 2012 Zakafest at the Little Haiti Cultural Center in Miami.  Markus Schwartz is a percussionist based in Brooklyn, New York, who focuses on the performance of traditional Haitian folk and roots music. Monvelyno Alexis is a Haitian musician in the sanba tradition, who is also based in Brooklyn, New York. Together, they perform as Vo-Duo.

Louis Leslie Marcelin, better known as "Sanba Zao" in the Haitian music community, is an influential mizik racine (roots music) artist. During the interview, Schwartz and Alexis discuss their musical influences, Haitian musicians that they have performed with, and the music that they play together as Vo-Duo. Marcelin discusses his development as a musician and the history of the racine and sanba musical traditions. They also talk about the importance of preserving Haiti’s cultural traditions, especially through music. Schwartz and Alexis translate Marcelin’s conversation from Haitian Creole.

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Miami, FL

Folder 17: Maggie Steber Interview, September 26, 2013Add to your cart.

Maggie Steber has worked as a documentary photographer in 63 countries. Her longtime work in Haiti received the prestigious Alicia Patterson Foundation Grant and the Ernst Haas Grant. A collection of her Haiti photographs was published in "Dancing on Fire: Photographs from Haiti," by Aperture. She was a contract photographer for Newsweek Magazine for four years and has worked for several press agencies as well as the Associated Press in New York as a photo editor. She served as Asst. Managing Editor of Photography and Features at the Miami Herald from 1999-2002 and guided the photo staff projects to become Pulitzer Prize finalists twice and a  winner the third time. In 2007, she received a grant from the Knight Foundation to design a new newspaper prototype through the new Knight Center for International Media at the Unviersity of Miami. In 2010, for the 3rd time, she will be invited as one of the master teachers at the World Press Photo Foundation's Joop Swart classes. In 2008, she was an honored guest speaker at the formal gathering of distinguished guests in Amsterdam. Her work appears regularly in the National Geographic Magazine, the New York Times, the Smithsonian, the Guardian of London, and many other American and European publications. Her photographs are widely exhibited and are included in many museum and private collections. She has served as a judge for the World Press Photo Foundation and the Alicia Patterson Foundation four times, as well as for other photographic competitions.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Miami, FL

Folder 18: Frantz "Kiki" Wainwright Interview, December 28, 2011Add to your cart.

Interview with Frantz "Kiki" Wainwright, a Haitian playwright, singer, actor, and dancer involved with Sosyete KouKouy in Miami. Born in Haiti, Wainwright began his acting career in Port-au-Peince before moving to New York, and eventually Miami. In 1985, he and Jan Mapou founded the Miami chapter of Sosyete KouKouy, a group dedicated to preserving Haitian culture in the United States. He has acted in many plays with the Sosyete Koukouy, including the first adaptation of William Shakespeare's Antigone into Kreyol. He helped form the band Ayabonmbe and has recorded with Les Shleu Shleu, but his primary musical focus is engagé, engaged political music. In this interview, Waitnwright discusses his career as an actor, musician, and writer. He explains the political nature of his music, and his work with Sosyete Koukouy, including a performance of Jacques Roumain's "Masters of the Dew."

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Length of interview (in minutes): 32:04

Miami, FL

Folder 19: Laurette Jean Interview, September 23, 2013Add to your cart.

Laurette Jean is a professional Budget Analyst, a talented dancer, a choreographer, and a dedicated community contributor. Since 2009, she has been working as a Principal Management and Budget Analyst at the office of Management and Budget in Broward County. However, her most significant work has been in the field of Haitian cultural traditions. She joined the Louinès Louinis Haitian Dance Theatre in 2002. She is the treasurer and the principal dancer with the company. She began dancing at the age of 12 years old at Horace Mann Middle School and received formal dance training in ballet, hip-hop, and West African dance at Florida International University. Mrs. Jean uses her talents and professional skills within the Haitian community. She has been instrumental at securing grants for the Pierre Toussaint Leadership & Learning Center. She teaches and choreographs Haitian dance at several elementary schools with large populations of Haitian students. She is also the co-founder of Harmony Dance Troupe, a liturgical dance group which focuses on improving self-esteem among teenagers.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Pembroke Pines, FL

Folder 20: Sandy Dorsainvil Interview, September 17, 2013Add to your cart.

Sandy Dorsainvil is the new Executive Director of the Little Haiti Cultural Center. She has worked in several important positions within the community, such as Excecutive Director of the Haitian Cultural Arts Alliance. With her exceptional programming and community development skills coupled with her knowledge of marketing, advertising, and public affairs, she has developed a great number of quality programs for the Broward school system and many other professional organizations. Sandy is a Haitian-American and has always lent a helping hand to her community. Her community activities include the following: Florida International Volunteer Corp Volunteer - conducted a workshop on college admission processes in Port-au-Prince, Haiti - City of Miami Arts and Entertainment Council, Mayor Appointee - Miami-Dade County District 5 Arts Advisory Panel - Haitian American Professionals Coalition, etc. She earned her Bachelor of Arts in History at Howard University and her Master of Business Administration in Marketing at Lynn University.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Pembroke Pines, FL

Folder 21: Marie Vickles Interview, September 25, 2013Add to your cart.

Originally from Boulder, Colorado, Marie has grown up with a deep appreciation of nature, family, and community. She completed her studies at F.I.T. in New York City, Miami-Dade College, and then at Florida State University, which includes degrees in both Visual Arts and Public Administration. Marie Vickles has worked for more than ten years as a Visual Arts Coordinator and a Teaching-Artist throughout the United States and Caribbean with both public and private organizations. As the Visual Arts and Crafts Coordinator for the Little Haiti Cultural Center - City of Miami, Marie is concerned with the development of new ways to bridge the connections between creativity and community engagement with the goal of encouraging livability through the arts. She is focused on creating high-quality accessible art programs for the residents of Little Haiti and South Florida. Marie serves the City of Miami as a membmer of the Arts & Entertainment Council and looks forward to contributing to the ever-growing arts community that calls Miami home. Most importantly, Marie is the proud mother of a creative and bright seven year old.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Pembroke Pines, FL

Folder 22: Gérard Campfort Interview, September 13, 2013Add to your cart.

Dr. Gérard Campfort was born in Haiti where he attended primary school, secondary school, and university. After graduating at l'École Normale Supérieure in Port-Au-Prince, he began his teaching career at several prestigious universities such as Faculté D'Ethnologie, Collége Canado-Haitien, Lycée de Pétion-Ville, etc. He then went to France to obtain a doctorate at the famous Sorbonne University in Paris. There, he taught at the university and became the President of the Groupment des Étudiants Haitiens á Paris. He is also a great soccer player and even became the soccer coach for that team while in France. His work with the soccer team was exceptional because in 1981, he was awarded Trophée du Meilleur Entraineur en France (Best Coach Award). Dr. Campfort then moved to the USA where he worked with the Broward County Department of Health, the Broward County Public Library as Outreach Coordinator for the Haitian Community. He is an exceptional musician and radio personality. Dr. Campfort is also a poet and has written a few books on the subject.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Pembroke Pines, FL

Folder 23: Maude Heurtelou and Fequière Vilsaint Interview, September 19, 2013Add to your cart.

Maude Heurtelou is the author of two novels and 50 children's books published by Educa Vision. She has published Fiesta! Haiti, edited by Paul Rosario and published by Grolier in 2004. She has also contributed to the Butterfly Way, 2001, edited by Edwidge Danticat and published by SOHO press. She contributed to Teen Life in America, 2004, edited by Cynthia Thompson and Co. and published by ABC CLIO. She contributed to So Spoke the Earth, edited and published by the Women Writers of Haitian Descent in 2012. Additionally, she is a well-known speaker in the area of public health, more specificially in Nutrition. As a Senior Public Health Nutritionist with a master's degree, she has worked for the state of Florida for 25 years and had addressed chronic health issues such as diabetes with children and adults. She has developed culturally sound printed audio or video educational materials for the Center for Disase Control and Prevention (CDC), for the University of South  Florida College of Publich Health, and for the University of Florida Department of Communicable Diseases. She is currently Educa Vision Inc.'s Vice-President.

Fequière Vilsaint is the Founder and President of Educa Vision Inc. (EVI), a publishing company that develops and publishes bilingual educational materials in Haitian Creole, English, and French. Fequière is also an author and a Molecular Biologist. He started Educa Vision Inc. in 1991 while still a researcher at USF and later left USF to expand EVI. He is the author of 14 dictionaries and many articles in academic journals. He speaks English, French, Haitian Creole, and Spanish, and he reads German and Portuguese. After High School, he migrated to Montreal where he studied Biology at Concordia University (BSC) then went on to graduate school in Quebec City (Universitè Laval) and Medford (Tuft University) MA in a graduate program in Biochemistry and Biotechnology. His previous activities include renewable energy research at McGill University and aquaculture infrastructure evaluation (fish, shrimp, algae) in Haiti and the Caribbean. He later moved to Florida to work at University of South Florida in the Medical School's Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Department. There, he did research on the metabolism of cholesterol in the liver, using rat liver as a model. The basic research in the Kennedy-Keller Laboratory later lead to the development of successful chemicals to control cholesterol in humans.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Pembroke Pines, FL

Folder 24: Liliane Nérette Louis Interview, September 16, 2013Add to your cart.

Liliane Nérette Louis grew up in a large family in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, as the daughter of a doctor. When she was a child, her mother used to sit down with the children in the evenings and tell stories in Haitian Creole. As she grew older, Louis herself began to tell the stories to her seven younger siblings and then later to her own three children. She begins all her engaging stories with a traditional formula: "Kric krak. We used to start the all the Haitian kont with krik, and the people listening to the kont will say krak." Louis fled the Duvalier regime by moving to New York in 1964. Looking for a better climate, she settled in Miami in 1977. Louis earned a B.A. in Professional Studies and an M.A. in Human Resource Development and Administration from Barry University. Before retiring from Jackson Memorial Hospital in 1999, she worked for many years as a Health Information Manager. Since the 1980s, she regularly performs the tales at festivals, schools, and other events. Louis has served twice as a Master Artist in the Florida Folklife Apprenticeship Program, and sje has won the Florida Individual Artist Fellowship in Folk Arts twice. She also wrote When Night Falls, Kric! Krak! Haitian Folktales (1999). Louis is also an extremely accomplished cook, frequently offering Haitian cooking courses through Miami-Dade College and other institutions, and is very knowledgeable about the use of plants in Haitian culture.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Pembroke Pines, FL

Folder 25: Rosie Gordon-Wallace Interview, September 16, 2013Add to your cart.

Rosie Gordon-Wallace is the Founder, Director & Curator of Diaspora Vibe Gallery and Diaspora Vibe Cultural Arts Incubator. Since 1996, Gordon-Wallace has initiated and produced transnational creative programs that redefine concepts of "diaspora", including the International Cultural Exchange program, the Caribbean Crossroads Series, the Artist-In-Residence program, an ongoing contemporary exhibitions program, and numerous community-based outreach projects. One might never have guessed that this licensed Medical Microbiologist and former Senior Consultant for Searle Pharmaceuticals from 1981-1999 is now the founder and curator of Diaspora Vibe, one of the most talked about Caribbean art incubators in Miami and on the east coast. Gordon-Wallace, always a passionate lover of art, made up her mind in 1999 to devote herself full-time to the gallery she created and dveloped. Diaspora Vibe Gallery and Diaspora Vibe Cultural Arts Incubator specializes in Caribbean and Latin American Art with an emphasis on emerging artists. The gallery supports the development of new work by Caribbean artists by offering exhibition opportunities, artist talks, workshops, and other skill-building core values for emerging artists. She is dynamic and unstoppable and continues to create international cultural experiences for Miami artists that add value to our cultural aesthetic and economy with activities that bind us to "Here and There". Rosie connects cultures and inspires action. She is also an active community member serving on the boards of diverse organizations, such as the National Performance Network, the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Peforming Arts, the Design & Architecture High School and Bayshore Lutheran. Rosie has been awarded the In the Company of Women 2013 Award for Arts and Entertainment, the Red Cross Spectrum Award for Culture, the Miami Beach Black Advisory Board Award for Arts and Culture, and the Arts and Business Culture Award for Shining Stars among other awards for Arts and Culture.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Pembroke Pines, FL

Folder 26: Lucie Tondreau Interview, September 27, 2013Add to your cart.

A native of Haiti, Lucie Tondreau immigrated to Montreal, Canada with her parents at the age of 7. In 1981, she settled in New York City, where she became intensely involved with the Haitian community. She felt compelled to keep the community informed through various media outlets. In 1984, Tondreau relocated to Miami where she became even more committed to assist Haitian immigrants to assimilate in the United States. During that year, she joined the Haitian Refugee Center and the Haitian American Community of Dade (HACAD) as a board member and a social service specialist. In that capacity, she provided counseling and other social services to hundred of Haitians. Ms. Tondreau is the mother of three children. She is the CEO of Tondreau & Associates, a public relations firm that was established in 1999. Lucia Tondreau has led an active life of civic engagement. She has worked as a social service specialist, counselor, language instructor, and a popular radio personality. Following the impact of Hurricane Wilma to South Florida, she organized a group of volunteers to help the less fortunate deal with the aftermath of the storm. Her efforts led to the daily distribution of 500 plates of food serving the elderly, the handicapped, pregnant women, and those with health issues. Mayor Lucie Tondreau is also a board member of the following associations: Metropolitan Planning Organization, Florida Commission on the Status of Women, Haitian-American Grassroots Coalition, Miami-Dade Art in Public Places, ASPIRA, tje Haitian Political Action Committee, the Citizen Independent Transportation Committeee, and the Caribbean Pan-African Network and the 79th Street Corridor.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Pembroke Pines, FL

Folder 27: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis Interview, September 24, 2013Add to your cart.

Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis is a professional story teller, librarian, dancer, and executive director of the Louinès Louinis Haitian Dance Theater. She came to New York City from Haiti to get her Bachelor in Liberal Arts and Masters in Library Science from St. John's University. After graduating with honors in 1986, she became a Children's Librarian at the Queens Borough Public Library and later rose to the position of Assistant Coordinator of Children's Services. Ms. Louisdhon-Louinis came to Miami-Dade's Public Library system in 1997 and quickly became the Assistant Director of Outreach, Programming and Special Services. One of her major accomplishments as the Assistant Director of Outreach Services was the implementation of the Art of Storytelling (AOS), an international cultural exchange program. Through AOS, she coordinated cultural and educational exchanges between librarians, storytellers, and performers in Miami, Jamaica, Ghana, Ireland, Puerto Rico, Haiti, Bahamas, Trinidad, Brazil, France, Columbia, Canada, Argentina, Denmark, and Taiwan. Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis presented storytelling and multicultural programming workshops in Ghana, Ireland, France, Haiti, and Canada. The Art of Storytelling Festival Day has become a signature library event attracting thousands of families to downtown Miami every year. In this capacity, she was also responsible for cultural programming, community outreach, and literacy programs, including early literacy at all 49 branches of the Library System. Ms. Louisdhon-Lounis is currently a dancer and executive director of the Louinès Lounis Haitian Dance Theater, Inc., a cultural dance company that performs authentic Haitian folk dances, songs and rhythm throughout the United States and Canada. The dance company has performed at selected venues, such as the North Miami Beach Julius Littman Performing Arts Theater, Wertheim Performing Arts Center, Carnegie Hall, Town Hall, Radio City Music Hall, and the Brooklyn Academy of Music.

Interviewer: Beatrice Skokan

Coral Gables, FL

Folder 28: Nancy St. Legér Interview, August 19, 2013Add to your cart.

Nancy St. Legér is an educator and an esteemed Haitian cultural artist. She has been performing Haitian dance traditions and rhythms for the past 20 years both in New York and South Florida. She is a graduate of St. Joseph's College (Brooklyn, NY) and Nova Suotheastern University (Davie, FL). She obtained a Master's Degree in Specific Learning Disabilities, and she is presently a Doctoral Candidate at Nova Southeastern University (Organizational Leadership). Nancy is an exceptional teacher who dedicated her life working with students with emotional and learning disabilities. She began her teaching career at P.S. 40M and P.S. 189M in Brooklyn, NY. In 1994, she moved to Miami and continued her crusade as a Speech and Language Pathologist and as a Special Education teacher. She is currently assigned to Coconut Grove Elementary as a teacher of students with learning disabilities. Nancy is very respected and admired by her peers and the parents of the students she is helping. However, in addition to her teaching career, Nancy St. Legér has been involved in the Haitian community through her cultural work as the Director of Folkloric Dance for Sosyete Koukouy Miami, Inc., as Director of Haitian Arts and Culture for Children and Film Makers. She is also President of HACCHI films, Inc. and appeared in two Haitian movies, Les Voleurs in Creole and Hard Times in English, and in the Charlie's Angels TV show. Her first film, Tanbou: Legacy of the Drums premiered on May 26, 2013 at the Little Haiti Cultural Center. She is currently developing an educational program for television. Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Miami, FL

Folder 29: Edwidge Danticat Interview, August 26, 2013Add to your cart.

Edwidge Danticat was born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti in 1969 and moved to Brooklyn when she was twelve years of age to join her parents. Two years after her arrival in the USA, she published her first writing in English, "A Haitian-American Christmas: Crémace and Creole Theatre," in New Youth Connections, a citywide magazine written by teenagers. She attended Barnard College where she received her BA in French literature. In 1993, she went on to complete her Master of Fine Arts degree in Creative Writing at Brown University. In 1994, her first novel, Breath, Eyes, Memory (Soho Press), was published. At the age of twenty-six, in 1995, she published Krik? Krak!, which was a finalist for the National Book Award and became an Oprah Book Club selection. Drawing on her experiences as a Haitian-American she writes of one of the most under-represented cultures in American literature using a style which is both poetic and passionate. Having also received the 1995 Pushcart Short Story Prize and fiction awards from the Caribbean Writer, Seventeen, and Essence magazines, she is now widely considered to be one of the most talented young authors in the United States. Danticat is the author of several other books and athologies, including Dew Breaker (2004), Behind the Mountains (2002), After the Dance: A walk through Carnival in Jacmel (2002), The Butterfly's Way: Voices from the Haitian Dyaspora (edited by Danticat, 2001), The Beacon Best of 2000: Great Writing by Women and Men of All Colors and Cultures (edited by Danticat 2000) and Farming of Bones (1998). Her latest work of fiction, Claire of the Sea Light, will be released in Hardcover on Tuesday, August 27, 2013. She has been the recipient of many prestigious awards, such as: the Fiction Award: The Caribbean Writer, the Woman of Achievement Award, the Barnard College American Book Award for the Farming of Bones, the Story Prize for Dew Breaker, a National Book Award nomination for Brother, I'm Dying, and the National Book Critics Circle Award for Brother, I'm Dying.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Miami, FL

Folder 30: Yolande Thomas Interview, August 28, 2013Add to your cart.

Yolande  Thomas is a beloved community figure in New York as well as in Miami. She is well known for her beauitful voice and her acting talents. However, most importantly, she has always been at the forefront of all community activities defending the rights of Haitian immigrants. She was named the 2013 Mother of the Year for her deovted work within the archdiocese of Miami and the Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Queens, NY. Growing up in Haiti, she enjoyed music, singing, and acting. At the age of five, she was already on the stage, performing at school activities. Yolande Thomas came to the United States in 1954. In New York, she obtained a certificate in office management at City College and a certificate in Socal Work at Adelphi University. In the late 1970's, Ms. Thomas became very activite in the Haitian choir at the church of the Sacred Heart in Queens. Around that time, an exodus of Haitians was leaving Haiti under the dictatorship of the present government for political and economical reasons. The need of a Haitian Center was necessary to provide services to the new arrivals. Reverent Father Guy Sansaricq, with the help of some concerned citizens, founded HAUP (Haitian Americans United for Progress). Ms. Thomas was one of the co-founders. Ms. Thomas became an activist when she met the "Haitian Fathers": Reverend Antoine Adrien, Reverend William Smart, Reverend Jean-Yves Urfie, and Reverend Emile Jacquot. As a Haitan artist, she participated in the plays of well-known playwrights, such as: Mr. Rene Audain, Mr. Otto Louis-Jacques, Mrs. Merceded Guignard (Deita), Mr. Felix Morisseau-Leroy. However, her "cup of tea" was when she joined "Sosyete Koukouy" in 1982 in New York. When she moved from New York to Miami, Mr. Jan Mapou, with a group of Haitian artists, founded the Miami Branch of "Sosyete Koukoy" in 1985. In that same year, Ms. Thomas served as an administrator at the Pierre Toussaint Haitian Catholic Center, Notre-Dame D'Haiti church, from 1985 through 2004 under the direction of Reverend Father Thomas G. Wenski, who is presently the Archbship of Miami.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Miami, FL

Folder 31: Matisou Legba Interview, August 12, 2013Add to your cart.

Legba holds the key to opening doors, which is what Matisou Legba does when he drums. Whether the listener is a long time fan or hearing him for the first time, each experience is an opportunity to have your senses, heart, mind, and spirit know the rhtyhm of life that drumming brings forth. Matisou has been studying and playing the traditional Vodou rites and tempos for over 25 years. He first learned these rhythms as a dancer. It was natural for him to be drawn to the healing of the drums while he was doing research, living with peasant teachers in the moutnains of Haiti and familiairizing himself with the 21 ceremonial rhythms, dances, and their ancestral meanings. As one of the young master dummers from Haiti, Matisou has ben privileged to drum for Lakou Souvenance, Lakou Badio, and Lakou Soukri, the three most sacred Vodou temples of his homeland. He has also performed professionally with such musical groups as Ayanbonmbe, Boukan Ginen, Samba Yo, Djam Lakay, and his own band, Djanaye. Matisou is best known for his work in the hit "Le a Rive," released in 1993 with Boukan Guinen, and in 2000 with Ayabonmbe's hit musical video "Severin."

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Miami, FL

Folder 32: Paulette Saint Lot Frank Interview, August 21, 2013Add to your cart.

Paulette Saint Lot was born in Pétion Ville, Haiti. She is the daugther of Aglae Rameau and Haitian Diplomat, Legislator, Jurist and Educator, the late Dr. Emile Saint-Lot. The late Dr. Emile Saint-Lot was the Haitian Plenipotentiary at the signing of the United Nations Charter in San Francisco in 1945. She often travelled with her father particularly in Europe. Following in her father's footsteps, Mrs. Saint-Lot Frank served in the Haitian diplomatic corps in Spain and England. She studied at the London and Madrid Conservatory. An outstanding mezzo-Soprano, she played soloist roles such as Carmen in Carmen de Bizet, Amneris in Aida de Verdi, with the New York State Opera and Harlem Civic Opera. Mrs. Frank returned to Haiti in the late 1950's and subsequently was offered a position in the Haitian Tourist Department. One of her major accomplishments is her contribution to Consecration, an adaptation of Macaya Roi and a comedy-drama by Andre Narcisse. In 1964, Paulette left Haiti a second time to immigrate to New York, USA with her 2 sons. It was there she met Dr. Henry Frank whom she married. Dr. Frank was then the Consul General of the Republic of Haiti in New York. During that time period, she served as the Executive Secretary of the Organization of African Unity to the United Nation in charge of Administration and Finance. Paulette is also the Artistic Director and Choreographer of the Ibo Dancers of Haiti. This well-known dance company has performed at many prestigious venues such as Carnegi Hall, Madison Square Gardens, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Place des Arts (Canada). Mrs. Saint-lot has been the recipient of many distinguished awards, such as the "Best Choreographer" Certificate of Appreciation for Contribution in Music and Dance by the American Embassy (Haiti). In 1985, Mrs. Saint-Lot Frank produced and directed the first Haitian musical in New York City, Lakou Lakay. The musical was first presented at the Brooklyn Academy of Music on June 2, 1985. Ms. Saint-Lot Frank was awarded the Best Director and Choregorapher prize for her work in Lakou Lakay.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Pembroke Pines, FL

Folder 33: Marleine Bastien Interview, August 15, 2013Add to your cart.

Marleine Bastien is considered a true leader in the Haitian community of South Florida. She is a graduate of Miami-Dade Community College and Florida International University. She obtained a Master's degree in Social Work in August 1987. Ms. Bastien is the founder, former president, and current Exectuive Director of Fanm Ayisyen Nan Miyami, Inc. (Haitian Women of Miami), an important community group that has provided much needed services not only to Haitian women and their families but the community at large. Marleine Bastien is a founding member of the Haitian-American Grassroots Coalition, an umbrella of 15 organizations that advocate for the fights of Haitian refugees, the Florida Immigrant Coalition, the Haitian Neighborhood Center, and Sant La and the Center for Haitian Studies. She has worked on the board of many organizations, including: HRS now DCF, Kristi's House, FIAC now American for Immigrants Justice, Human Service Coalition now Catalyst Miami, Jobs with Justice, the Haitian-American Historical Society, and the Haitian-American Professional Coalition. A passionate and articulate spokesperson, she formed the "Justice coaltion for the Haitian Children of Guantanamo" to advocate for Haitian children incarcerated there in the early 1990's and also appeared on the Oprah Winfrey show to lend her expertise to a discussion of the devastating effects that prolonged detention at Guantanamo had on Haitian children in 1995. She has been recognized with important awards. She was also named in the Miami Herald in 1999 as one of the "Forty Special People to Watch in the next Millennium." She received among others, The Human Rights Award from Amnesty International in 2000, the Woman of the Year Award from Ms. magazine in 2001, the Leadership for a Changing World Award Ford Foundation in 2001, and in 2005, she was chosen as one of the "35 Most Remarkable Women" in the World by Essence magazine.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Miami, FL

Folder 34: Louinès Louinis Interview, August 5, 2013Add to your cart.

Louinès Louinis is a choreographer, dancer, musician, folklorist, and founder and artistic director of the Louinès Louinis Haitian Dance Theater. Louinis studied dance and theatre with Erzulie Dantor Troupe, Theatre de Verdure Massillon Coicou and the Conservatory of Dramatic Arts in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. He achieved national distinction as the principal dancer and choreographer of Troupe Folklorique National (Haiti's national theater) and Troupe Bacoulou. He toured widely throughout the Americas with both companies, sharing the stage with Sonora Matancera and a young Celia Cruz, among others, before leaving for New York City in 1964. There, he studied flute at the Brooklyn Conservatory of Music and ballet, jazz, and modern dance with New Dance Group in Manhattan. Louinis is an accomplished educator with many years of experience teaching Haitian folklore and dance to students of all ages. He was Associate Professor at the College of Staten Island, CUNY, teaching Afro-Haitian dance, jazz, and modern dance for 25 years. From 1989-2000, he was a Master Instructor of Haitian dance techniques at the Katherine Dunham Technique Seminar in St. Louis, Missouri and at the Marygrove College Dance Program in Detroit, Michigan. More recently, he has taught Caribbean dance technique and culture at Florida International University as an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Dance.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Pembroke Pines, FL

Folder 35: Joanne Hyppolite Interview, August 9, 2013Add to your cart.

Dr. Joanne Hyppolite is multi-talented. On weekdays, she is the Chief curator at the History of Miami Museum where she oversees the museum's exhibitions and collections department. On nights, weekends, and on stolen work days, she transforms into a writer, published author, and a lover of literature. Joanne has published two popular middle-grade novels for children: Seth and Samona, which won the 1994 Marguerite DeAngeli Prize for New Children's Fiction and Ola Shakes it Up. Her short stories have also been published in The Caribbean Writer and in The Butterfly's Way: Voice from the Haitian Dyaspora. She holds a Ph. D. in literature from t he University of Miami and an M.A. in Afro-American Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles. An experienced public speaker, she lectures widely at schools, libraries, and conferences on African-American and Caribbean culture and Chidlren's literature. In her interview, Dr. Hyppolite shares her childhood growing up in Boston in a diverse neighborhood. She is passionate about her writing and continues to inspire young readers with her stories.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Miami, FL

Folder 36: Jan Mapou Interview, August 9, 2013Add to your cart.

Jean-Marie Denis a.k.a Jan Mapou was born in the city of Les Cayes in the southern part of Haiti. He studied at the University of Ethnology and became a school teacher in several schools in Haiti (1965-1969). Later, he earned a BA degree in Accounting. In the cultural arena, Jan Mapou is one of the founders of the Haitian Creole Movement, which began in Haiti in 1965. That same year, he created Sosyete Koukouy or Society of Fireflies, a multi-disciplinary arts company dedicated to preserving Haitian cultural traditions and rituals. In 1969, Mapou was jailed by the Duvalier (Papa Doc) governement for his intense activities in promoting Haitian Kreyòl throughout the country. He was forced to immigrate to New York in 1972. Then in 1984, he moved to Miami where has put down roots and founded the Miami chapter of Sosyete Koukouy in 1985. Jan Mapou is the artistic director of Sosyete Koukouy of New York and Miami. Its immediate mission is to build bridges and increase dialogue and understanding between Haitians and other ethnic groups. The company has performed throughout the USA, Canada, and Haiti. Jan Mapou and the artists of Sosyete Koukouy were key players in working with Miami-Dade County to make "Discover Miami Program" a successful community event for four years. Mapous is well-known as a poety, playwright, columnist, and author of several books. Jan Mapou is the owner of Librer Mapou (Mapou Bookstore) next to the Caribbean Marketplace in the heart of Little Haiti. It is the only Haitian owned bookstore in the nation with an impressive inventory of books in Creole, French, English, and Spanish exclusively about Haiti. He received the MAXIE Award; the highest award an artist/promoter may receive in Miami and recently the governor of Florida, Charlie Chris, honored him in Tallahaseee. He was the recipient of the 2007-Folk Life Award from the State of Florida. In June 2011, he was a special guest of the Library of Congress in Washington D.C. where he recorded his many accomplishments for history and humanity.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Miami, FL

Folder 37: Edeline Beauvais Mondestin, August 26, 2013Add to your cart.

Mrs. Mondestin holds a Bachelor's Degree in Nursing and a Health Care Risk Management Degree. During her thirty five years as a Registered Nurse, sixteen years as a Social Services Administrator, four years as a Division Director and currently as an Acting Chief of Miami Dade County Elderly, Disability and Veterans Services Bureau for one year, Edeline Beauvais Mondestin has gained a reputation as a strong advocate for women and people with disabilities. She volunteers with Mercy's Hospital Mobile Unit and the Borinquen Clinic that provide health care to underserved senior citizens in Little Haiti and Little Havana. Edeline has played a vital role in the Alzheimer's Association. Since 1994, she has been a support group leader for the Greater Miami Chapter of the Alzheimer's Association. Mrs. Mondestin has created the Florida Association on HIV Over Fifty (FLAHOF), an advocacy organization that provides services to this special group. In 2002, Mrs. Mondestin successfully lobbied Miami-Dade County Mayor Alex Penelas to establish a Haitian Senior Center in Little Haiti and was successful in obtaining a $350,000 grant to start and maintain the program through Miami Dade County Department of Human Services. Edeline's energy has also been directed at fighting for the right of immigrants and her efforts have been aimed at  working on the Haitian Refugee Fairness Act, a law that gave residency to thousand of Haitians. Aside from her advocacy work, she hosted a radio program entitled "Travayè an Navan" meaning "Workers on the Move." This program advocated for better working conditions and insurace for workers. Edeline also hosts two cable television programs, "New Issue for a Healthy Community" with two physicians and "Living Beyond Limits." She has also appeared on a "Haitian Forum," a cable television program focusing on Haitian issues. She wrote several articles about: women's issues, nutrition, Alzheimer's, drugs, alcohol abuse, AIDS, and the elderly. Over the past years, she has been a recipient of numerous county, national, and humanitarian awards.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Miami, FL

Folder 38: Marie-Paule Woodson Interview, September 12, 2013Add to your cart.

Interviewer: Lucrèce Louisdhon-Louinis

Miami, FL

Folder 39: Marc Joseph and Rodney Lindor of Ayabonmbe InterviewAdd to your cart.

Interview with Marc Joseph and Rodney Lindor of the band Ayabonmbe, a world beat musical group that formed in 1991, and is comprised of members from Haiti and the United States. Marc Joseph in the bass player and band leader, and Rodney Lindor is the lead singer and dance director. This audio-only interview was conducted and edited by Kevin Mason for broadcast on the University of Miami radio station, WVUM. In the interview, Lindor discusses his musical background and the Haitian community in St. Louis, Missouri. Joseph discusses the band’s musical style and music education activities and plans. The interview features two songs, including “U Don’t Know Me.”

Interviewer: Kevin Mason

Coral Gables, FL

Folder 40: Max Rameau Intervew, June 1, 2011Add to your cart.

Interview with Max  Rameau, the foremost and most publicly known activist with Take Back the Land. He also leads the Center for Pan-African Development and has worked extensively with Brothers of the Same Mind and Cop Watch. At the cusp of the housing crisis, Rameau invited several other South Florida-based black activists to meetings held at Marleine Bastien's office, a group that later became known as the Black Response to the Crisis Group. The group decided to take action by taking over public land and asserting black political leadership over that land. The first action taken was the erecting of the Umjoa Village Shantytown, and later housing liberations and eviction defenses. As Take Back the Land progressed to the national level and took on the shape of a movement, Rameau remained its most vocal proponent and figurehead. He relocated to Washington D.C. to play a stronger role as an alternative voice on the housing crisis. Rameau is a Pan-Africanist by worldview and in political theory, although he no longer frames Take Back the Land as Pan-Africanist or the Black Nationalist Project.

Interviewer: Rudo Kemper

Length of interview (in minutes): 2:37:00

Miami, FL.

Folder 41: Performance of Shleu Shleu at Big Night in Little HaitiAdd to your cart.
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